Run at the Cry

I was studying Hebrews 4 and was blessed by Adam Clarke’s commentary on verse 16:

Hebrews 4:16  Therefore let us draw near with confidence to the throne of grace, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.

The word βονθεια is properly rendered assistance, help, or support; but it is an assistance in consequence of the earnest cry of the person in distress, for the word signifies to run at the cry, θειν εις βοην, or επι βοην θειν. So, even at the throne of grace, or great propitiatory, no help can be expected where there is no cry, and where there is no cry there is no felt necessity; for he that feels he is perishing will cry aloud for help, and to such a cry the compassionate High Priest will run; and the time of need is the time in which God will show mercy; nor will he ever delay it when it is necessary. We are not to cry to-day to be helped to-morrow, or at some indefinite time, or at the hour of death. We are to call for mercy and grace when we need them; and we are to expect to receive them when we call. This is a part of our liberty or boldness; we come up to the throne, and we call aloud for mercy, and God hears and dispenses the blessing we need. (underlining mine)

Faith is a frequent theme in Hebrews, and it’s no different in this passage, except for the fact that it’s not explicitly mentioned. No one is going to run to God’s throne and cry out for help, expecting to receive it, unless they have living faith. I definitely needed to read and understand this, to see where my own faith is and to exhort me to always believe.

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1 Response to Run at the Cry

  1. Lisa Scott says:

    That’s good. Amen to that!

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